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Emerald Ash Borer Confirmed in Village of Greendale

With the recent announcement of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) in the village of Greendale, it’s important to know how to detect and respond to this tree-killing borer.

While both Wisconsin trees and Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) are dormant during the winter season, the spring spread of this tree-killing borer is just months away. With millions of ash trees in danger, a new case of EAB was confirmed in the village of Greendale, in Milwaukee County.  Fifteen Wisconsin counties are currently under quarantine, including Milwaukee County, to help slow the spread of the borer. The quarantine prohibits movement of materials such as infested firewood, nursery stock and timber that could spread EAB.

Tips to Save Ash Trees

Ash trees are very beautiful, provide significant value to homeowners’ properties
and it is important that we preserve them. They help reduce heating and cooling
costs, reduce air pollution and storm water runoff and increase property value.
Ash trees do not have to die if the necessary precautions are taken.

Some tips for preventing an infestation:

  • Before considering removal or replacement,
    keep in mind that treatments are a more economical approach to EAB management
  • Do not move firewood. Purchase local firewood on trips and use all of it. This will reduce the chance of spreading the disease to new areas.
  • Be familiar with the signs of an infestation and contact a professional for assistance if you suspect EAB.

All About EAB

Emerald Ash Borer is a small metallic green beetle that feeds on the wood tissue just beneath the bark. It is 100 percent fatal to ash trees and has killed tens of millions of them across the United States. Wisconsin forests contain 727 million ash trees, nearly 7 percent of the tree population. In urban areas, there are 5.2 million ash trees.

Trees with EAB may show several signs of infestation. One major sign is death of the foliage at the top or crown of the tree. The tree may also produce numerous trunk sprouts. Another sign is vertical bark splits in the tree. Finally, woodpecker feeding usually indicates the tree is infested with insects.

EAB was accidentally imported into the United States in the wood of shipping crates from China where the beetle is native. It was found in southeast Wisconsin in August of 2008.

If you suspect EAB or want to learn more about preventative treatments, please contact First Choice Tree Care at 262-242-1274 or visit www.firstchoicetreecare.com.

This post is contributed by a community member. The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Patch Media Corporation. Everyone is welcome to submit a post to Patch. If you'd like to post a blog, go here to get started.

Jason Dembosky February 14, 2013 at 07:27 PM
We knew this was coming. And so did the Village Board. They put aside money in the 2013 Budget for tree replacement in the event this happened. Kudos to our Trustees for being proactive! Let's hope we can contain it as much as possible to slow the spread.

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