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EAT MOR FREDUMS

How will your beliefs be recognized by the new morality police?

Related:

For those not aware, the CEO of Chick-fil-a, Dan Cathy, came out making the following statement regarding his beliefs:

“We are very much supportive of the family -- the biblical definition of the family unit. We are a family-owned business, a family-led business, and we are married to our first wives. We give God thanks for that. We intend to stay the course. We know that it might not be popular with everyone, but thank the Lord, we live in a country where we can share our values and operate on biblical principles."

This stance has of course drawn much criticism.  It has also initiated a boycott of the restaurant itself.  Most recently, Kermit the frog and Miss Piggy came out to stand against Chick-fil-a.  While at the same time it is not reflective of the business policy of Chick-fil-a.

I have no problem with this boycott.  In fact, I support this style of action.  When you find a business that operates contrary to your beliefs, it is your right not to patronize the business.  I also support the right of organizations to speak out against Chick-fil-a and convince other people that this or any other business has a view point contrary to that of the organization.

Where the line is drawn is when a government entity decides that it will prevent a company from doing its business because of the viewpoints of the CEO or any other employee of that business.

Whenever I as a Christian speak out about gay marriage, birth control or abortion; I am immediately chastised for attempting to impose my morality on the country.  The idea presented to me is that our country allows people the freedoms to make decisions regarding their love life or their bodies that must not be infringed against.  However, recently government officials within Chicago and Boston have decided that they are allowed to impose morality on their cities.

Early this week, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel stated that:

“Chick-fil-A’s values are not Chicago values. They’re not respectful of our residents, our neighbors and our family members. And if you’re gonna be part of the Chicago community, you should reflect Chicago values,”

This was followed by Joe Moreno, Alderman of the Chicago’s 1st District, who let his constituents know that:

"Same sex marriage, same-sex couples - that's the civil rights fight of our time. To have those discriminatory policies from the top down is just not something that we're open to. ...We want responsible businesses."

Chicago is not a lone wolf in this desire by local governments to impose morality.  In Boston, Mayor Thomas Menino, said:

“Chick-fil-A doesn’t belong in Boston,” Menino told the Boston Herald. “You can’t have a business in the city of Boston that discriminates against a population. We’re an open city, we’re a city that’s at the forefront of inclusion.”(The oddest part of that statement is for Menino to call Boston an open city as he closes the door on a specific belief.)

Please explain to me how this is not an attempt by the government to impose a morality on its citizens. 

I understand that cities have the right to zone area for specific use and/or non-use.  For instance, people usually request that their elected officials prevent things like strip clubs, bars or heavy industry from moving into their neighborhood.   However, those objections are based on the nature of the buisness and not the beliefs of the owner. To my understanding Chick-fil-a is not prohibiting those with a gay lifestyle from enjoying a sandwich.  Nor to my knowledge is it the policy of the Chick-fil-a to verify sexual preference prior employment.  Since, no laws within Chicago or Boston have been violated and Chick-fil-a is attempting to/or has establish a restaurant in an area zoned for that use; the values of the CEO should play no part in the government’s decision.

In our politically correct society, Dan Cathy must have understood that he would attract a fire storm because of his beliefs.  However, no business man should feel that his company will be treated differently by the government because of his beliefs.  It should be up to the people to protect the morality of the country and not a government hell bent on control.

This post is contributed by a community member. The views expressed in this blog are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Patch Media Corporation. Everyone is welcome to submit a post to Patch. If you'd like to post a blog, go here to get started.

skinnyDUDE July 27, 2012 at 10:51 PM
Hypocrisy Alert .....Can the left be this Ignorant???? Until recently President Obama held the same stance on gay marriage as the CEO of Chick-fil-A,. Why wasn't he an Evil uncaring bastard in the last Election? He had the same stance. You liberals and your opinions get more laughable by the moment . Another OFFICIAL = GIVE ME A BREAK Moment from the Looney Left!
Bren July 28, 2012 at 02:35 AM
Mr. Hoffa, did you write something? I must have skimmed right past it!
James R Hoffa July 28, 2012 at 04:57 AM
@Bren - If that's the case, then your skimming skills must be so poor, that I honestly can't fathom what good they actually provide you! Studies have shown that those with fourth grade reading level or lower may not possess the ability to effectively skim. It's OK Bren, some people are just less capable than others. It's nothing to be embarrassed or ashamed of. As you're not an effective skimmer, then Hoffa suggests that you actually commit the time in the future to reading for detail - your takeaway and comprehension of the things you read will be vastly improved! In fact, if you take Hoffa's advice to heart, I'm sure that it'll reduce your tendency to embrace unfounded conspiracy theories and perpetuate them here on the Patch. Or at least one would hope that with a better understanding, you'd at least vastly reduce engaging in such nonsense! The truth shall set you free Bren! It'll be like looking upon the world with a fresh set of eyes. Of course, Hoffa's not rushing to call his bookie any time soon ;-)
Richard Head July 28, 2012 at 11:54 AM
Bren says: "The CEO of Chick-fil-a is free to express his opinion. However, if his corporation practices discrimination against a protected group (refuse service, employment opportunities) it raises issues of eligibility for any taxpayer-funded contracts, subsidies, grants, etc. My guess is that the legalities were carefully checked before Cathy indulged in the luxury of a anti-gay stance." In this paragraph, Bren points out what is wrong with America today. 1. Protected Groups - This is reverse discrimination and the practice of creating protected groups, for whatever reason, must end. 2. Taxpayer funded subsidies for private Corporations - This is always wrong - and practiced by both sides. It is time to end this mis-use and abuse of tax money. 3. Private Business excluding "undesirables" or members of "protected groups" should be a right of private business. 4. "The CEO of Chick-fil-a is free to express his opinion" - who is then punished by Liberals and members of the "protected group" for exercising that right, while the Liberals and members of the "protected group" would sue for discrimination anyone who punished them when they freely express their opinions. 5. The LGBT Community partners with NAMBLA and wants to move the agenda towards sexual emancipation of children.
James R Hoffa July 28, 2012 at 04:15 PM
The federal 'protected classes' laws prohibit employers and business from discriminating against people based upon the following grounds: Race Color Religion National Origin Age Gender Familial Status Disability Veteran Status Genetic Information You'll notice that sexual orientation is not on the list. Of course, there are always exceptions, such as in tv/film/stage acting, etc.

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